MARK MAKING IN WATERCOLORS – PART 2

Mark making is a simple technique that helps you get expressive with your brushes. In simple terms, it’s a way of getting to know your brushes and how they work. This post details out the process of painting a landscape from start to finish keeping in mind the technique of mark making. Enjoy!

In this second part of mark making in watercolors, learn to create a finished illustration from start to finish using a round brush and expressive strokes. - Inkstruck Studio

Before you start reading this post, I encourage you to read the first part where I explain what mark making is and how expressive different brushes can be.

MARK MAKING IN WATERCOLORS PART 1

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Brushes used:-

Step 1: Choose a reference is your choice. I deliberately chose one that has prominent leaves and trees to showcase mark making.

First, the background needs to be established. My reference had a small water body and mountains. Using very little pigment and lots of water, blend and create soft washes. Allow this to dry.

Step 2: In the background, the mountains have a cluster of trees. For that, I used the round number 2 brush to make scribble marks that form the background for the trees. This was done using very little pigment and water as well.

Step 3: Coming to the foreground, the right side has branches and leaves that are part of a tree peeping in.  Again, using the round number 2 brush, I painted the branches leaving space for the leaves.

For the leaves, I used deliberate strokes with my number 8 round brush. These strokes clearly indicate that they are in the foreground as the eye sees clearer shapes in the front.

In this second part of mark making in watercolors, learn to create a finished illustration from start to finish using a round brush and expressive strokes. - Inkstruck Studio

Step 4: I chose to draw some more foliage in the foreground using some muted greens just to create a bit of contrast. These strokes are also deliberate but longer than the ones on the right as they are grass.

Step 5: Next, using a no.2 round brush, paint the trees a little more prominent but still lighter than the foreground. This video on my Instagram page shows the strokes I did to create the trees. The bolder strokes make the trees more prominent.

Lastly, do the foreground trees on the left to complete the painting.

In this second part of mark making in watercolors, learn to create a finished illustration from start to finish using a round brush and expressive strokes. - Inkstruck Studio

I hope you really enjoyed this tutorial. This and the previous post will help you understand mark making in watercolor. If you loved this tutorial, don’t forget to check these out below.

As always, thank-you for stopping by. Y’all rock! x

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About zakkiya hamza @ inkstruck

Zakkiya is the creative blogger and founder of Inkstruck Studio. She’s a self taught artist who let go of her architecture profession to pursue her passion in art. Zakkiya likes to write detailed tutorials in watercolor, calligraphy, and hand lettering. She also teaches watercolor workshops occasionally in Doha where she’s based currently. Other passions include traveling, photography, and basketball.When she’s not working, you can find her cuddling and running around with her toddler boy.

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